Ranking poorly in SERPs? A Checklist for Uncovering the Underlying Issues

There’s nothing more frustrating than creating great content that’s never read by the people you wrote it for. How do you find more readers? The best strategy is to make it easier for people to find, and that means focusing on the search engine results page (SERP).

The science of SEO is designed to do just that by reverse engineering how people look for answers on the web (i.e. “search”). It encompasses:

  • Content analysis, and persona development to ensure you write for the person most likely to search for and read your content
  • Keywords and related keywords that will raise your content higher in the search engine results page
  • Site taxonomy, to ensure your pages don’t compete against one another, and preventing your content from “surfacing” (i.e. get a high ranking in the search engine results)

 

Why Content Ranks Poorly

If you’re not getting the traffic you hoped for, begin by pinpointing the problem areas.

1. Identify the problems – Begin by understanding how your pages actually perform using your website analytics tool. Are they getting good traffic? Do visitors spend time on them, or do they leave just as soon as they land? Prioritize the specific pages that are underperforming.

2. Perform a keyword analysis – Once you’ve identified the pages with the best performance identify the keywords that are driving prospects to it. A keyword analytics platform, such as the Magento SEO extension, or SEO Centro, will streamline this process, allowing you to compare the performance of two pages with the same keyword in a single view. Consider deleting the page with the weaker performance.  If you want to keep pages with weaker performance, consider using a related keyword or LSI term in its URL, title tag or H1 tag.

3. Look for duplicate content – Duplicate content is the enemy of SEO. The goal of a search engine is to identify the page that is most relevant to the user who performed the query, and search engines don’t respond well when multiple pages target the same keyword. How does they know which is the most important, and should be served up to the user? In many cases, the search engine responds to that confusion by lowering your site in the search results rankings. To combat this challenge, identify pages that compete with one another by using the same keyword in the URL, title tag or H1 tag.

4. Use Backlinking – Search engines need to look at a variety of signals to determine if a how a page should rank. Backlinks, which occur when another website references your webpage via a hyperlink, is an important metric for Google. In a sense, they’re popularity signals for the search engine, so you should try to get as many backlinks from as many quality sources or related bloggers from within your industry as possible. Social sharing will boost your backlinking profile, so be sure to make it easy for your users to share your webpages on social media.

Fixing Underperforming Pages

1. Republish content for freshness – Your web page may have great content, but if it hasn’t been updated in a few years, search engines will see it as old.

2. Add new content, or update your page – It’s a good idea to review your content on a regular basis and update as needed. For instance, your industry may have adopted new business terms, and refreshing your page to reflect them will boost your rankings.

3. Quick fixes – If you truly have nothing new to add, consider turning headers into questions searchers ask (e.g. When is Tom Brady’s birthday)?

Tips for Getting Your Content Found: Before You Write

1. Research Keywords & Latent Semantic Indexing – The first step is to gain a better understand the current level of interest (or demand) for that topic in the market. Keywords help you gain that understanding. Let’s say your company has introduced a line of meal kits. The first step is to assess the demand (i.e. or number of times) people enter “meal kits” into a search engine.

If the keyword generates a lot of volume, you’ll know it’s a hot topic. The same holds true for latent semantic indexing (LSI) terms. LSI terms are keywords that are semantically related to your primary keyword (e.g. vegetarian meal kits, farm-to-table meal kits, etc.).

LSI terms provide important insight into the direction the market is going. If they’re popular enough, you’ll want to include them in the content you create. You can also use these terms for future blog posts or other content, as well as to inform your company’s product roadmap.

2. Create a Taxonomy and Keyword Strategy Before You Write – Taxonomy refers to how your company classifies the main topics that relate to your business, products and services, so that users can easily find them via a search. For instance, let’s say you have many styles of mobile phones on your site. Your taxonomy will include  mobile phones, and within that folder you may have separate pages for Samsung, Motorola and so on. This is taxonomy.

The trick to successful taxonomy lies in identifying the main topics to emphasize, as well as the relevant sub-topics for each main topic. If your site only sells mobile phones, then “Samsung Galaxy” and “Google Pixel” may be appropriate main topics. If your site offers a broad range of devices, than these terms will be better suited as sub-topics to “smartphones.”

From a URL standpoint, it’s important to give each page a name that describes the content it contains. For instance, if you create a page about portable smartphone charges, don’t simply call it “smartphone.” Doing so will result in attracting traffic that isn’t relevant to your products.

3. Use Buying-Journey Personas to Drive Content – What do keyword searches reveal about the consumer’s intent? Some keywords are used when people are just beginning to research a topic; others indicate a more mature understanding of the topic. By continuously tracking keywords and user online behavior, the SEO industry has learned how to use keywords to develop buying journey personas.

Once you’ve created a list of appropriate keywords and LSI terms for your company, you will be in a position to assess where likely readers of your content are in their buying journeys. This insight will help you craft highly relevant content for the reader.

For instance, if the keyword indicates the consumer is in the early stages of the buying journey, you will want to cover basic information on the topic. If they’re later in the later stages, you can assume they have a solid grounding, and can dive straight into the nuances or complexities they’ll need to consider.

Content marketing is a great way to attract new prospects to your brand — as well as establish your company as a leader in your space. But it only works if people who are important to you can find it. This isn’t a matter of luck, it’s straightforward science. With a bit of upfront planning and thought into the taxonomy, keywords and LSIs you use, you can turbocharge your content marketing.